Comiso Airport - Siracusa - Unesco WHS site "Syracuse and the rock necropolis of Pantalica"

Comiso Airport - Siracusa - Unesco WHS site "Syracuse and the rock necropolis of Pantalica"

Sicily
Special Itineraries


131.5 Km

Siracusa should be reached by sea, but another important gateway for admiring its many treasures is Comiso Airport. Located in the province of Ragusa, the airport is well connected to Siracusa, on the Ionian Sea. Siracusa is renowned for its civil and religious buildings, most of which can be found on the Island of Ortigia, the oldest part of the city, with its many subterranean chambers and monuments. Not far from Siracusa is the rocky necropolis of Pantalica, a vast nature reserve that surprises visitors with traces dating back to the Bronze Age. The tombs of the necropolis, excavated in the rock, give the rock formations in the area of Pantalica the aspect of a beehive. Inside there are cultural stratifications, inscriptions and artistic traces from many different historical periods, which can be admired in the Paolo Orsi Regional Archaeological Museum of Siracusa.

 

In occasion of Expo Milano 2015, the Italian Government is working to promote the "EXPO and Territories" initiative, a journey in discovery of Italy's hidden treasures and agro-alimentary excellence. "EXPO 2015" explores any and all cultural heritage tied to the initiative.

Iblei Comiso Airport

Comiso

Iblei Comiso Airport

Comiso Airport (IATA: CIY, ICAO: LICB) (aka “Vincenzo Magliocco” Airport, named for an Italian Air Force Brigadier General), is located in Sicily, at 5 km from Comiso and 15 km from Ragusa, in the communes of Comiso and Chiaramonte Gulfi. Originally built as a military airport, it was opened to domestic and international commercial flights on 30 May 2013.

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UNESCO WH SITE "Syracuse and the Rocky Necropolis of Pantalica"

Pantalica

UNESCO WH SITE "Syracuse and the Rocky Necropolis of Pantalica"

The area of Pantalica, near Siracusa, is extensively dotted with ancient rocky necropolises of enormous speleological, archaeological and anthropological interest because they consist of myriad natural and artificial grottoes that have been used for many different purposes over the centuries. In particular, they have been included by the Unesco in its World Heritage List as an exceptional testimony of the transition from the Bronze Age to the Iron Age on the island.
The area was inhabited by indigenous people escaping incursions from the sea, and preserves numerous vestiges of these settlements. Several of the grottoes contain frescoes and graffiti dating back to the time in which they were lived in.
The key characteristic of the area, however, are the tombs. The necropolis of Filiporto, for example, is made up of about a thousand tombs dotted along the slopes and in the valley of the Anapo, belonging to the last phase of the city of Pantalica, with the acropolis on high dominating the man-made caverns below. Later, on top of the acropolis, was built the "Prince's Palace", which remains the only stone building of the period.  The prehistoric tombs cut into the vertical rock face give the impression of a beehive and the numerous archaeological finds can be admired in the "Paolo Orsi" Archaeological Museum in Siracusa.
The area is of great natural interest and is now part of the nature reserve of Pantalica, Valle dell'Anapo and Torrente Cava Grande.

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73.3 Km

120.2 Km

Island of Ortigia - Siracusa

Siracusa

Island of Ortigia - Siracusa

The Island of Ortigia is the oldest part of the city of Siracusa in Sicily. With its many and important churches and palaces, it was famous even in antique times because of the so-called Arethuse Fountain, a fresh water source that has inspired many stories and myths over the centuries. The ground beneath the city is riddled with subterranean tunnels and chambers excavated by the inhabitants of Siracusa and even used, during World War II, as air-raid shelters. Some of the chambers have Byzantine frescoes, like the one in the Piazza Duomo, while a chamber in the Jewish quarter, the "Giudecca", features a source of fresh water, despite the fact that it is surrounded by the sea. On the island there are palm and ficus trees, while papyrus plants grow spontaneously inside the Arethuse Fountain, which is also called the "duck pond" because inhabited by these fowls and by freshwater fish.
The many, primarily Catholic, religious buildings in Ortigia include the Cathedral, with its baroque facade, which, together with the other baroque, rococo and art nouveau buildings, make it one of the most outstanding monumental art sites in Italy. Very little remains of the Spanish fortifications, but Ortigia hosts numerous thematic museums for tourists interested in its thousand-year long history. The Museum of the Sea - Sirmuma, entirely dedicated to the maritime history of Siracusa and the Sicilian Puppet Theatre Museum - Museo Aretuseo dei Pupi - dedicated to the Opera dei Pupi, another Unesco Heritage of Humanity, also attract large numbers of visitors, like the bustling fish market, fish being a staple ingredient of Siracusa cuisine, for its lively atmosphere. Next to Ortigia is the magnificent coast of Plemmirio.

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Marine Protected Area of Plemmirio

Syracuse

Marine Protected Area of Plemmirio

The Marine Protected Area of Plemmirio encompasses the eastern coast of the Maddalena Peninsula (though more often called "isola" or island) and boasts a thriving sea life, in addition to its concentration of archaeological markers from prehistory to the present. The park has been well-thought out and well-curated to accommodate snorkelers and scuba divers of all ages and abilities. From Capo (cape) Castelluccio to Punta Tavernara, the seabeds are low and uniform for hundreds of meters before descending deeper (in the area of Capo Murro di Porco), where they reach between 30 and 40 m. At this point, it is possible to observe tunas, greater amberjacks, sharks and sea mammals, including dolphins, whales and sperm whales.

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131.5 Km

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